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Apollo
October 20, 2011, 11:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I've stopped off at the Commando Memorial at Spean Bridge a few time - (yes, there's a derelict ROC post within a stone's throw) - and it's a desolate place to be at the wrong time of year.

I don't say that as any sort of criticism whatsoever (in case anyone gets the wrong idea), I merely mention it to note that I have usually been completely alone up there, and I think only one other car pulled in once. And the location is stunning, and there is nothing and no-one else there. If you want to contemplate the moment, then the place is ideal.

As for security though.

One would think that simple respect would mean that this would not be an issue, but it seems that the collection box was stolen back in 2008, and this week's news is of the removal/theft of a floral tribute in the form of a half barrel.

BBC News - Floral tribute stolen from Lochaber Commando Memorial

There's not much point in saying more.

Not much that can be done, unless a web cam is hidden somewhere.
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jmb
October 21, 2011, 12:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I took some pictures there last week so had a look through them to see if I could see what they meant but can't see the object they describe so I presume it was placed there later in the week.

MB
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Dugald
October 21, 2011, 11:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The BBC News item of Oct 20th states that: "The Commando Memorial at Spean Bridge is dedicated to those who trained in the area during World War II".

I have visited this memorial twice, and as far as I recall the above quotation from the memorial by the BBC is correct. However, in the BBC article it states: " A nearby memorial garden honours servicemen and women killed in conflicts, including operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.". I would hope that this nearby memorial garden is recognised as having nothing whatever to do with the Commando Memorial at Spean Bridge. I submit that not only has a contribution-box been stolen... the sanctity of the location has also been interfered with!
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Apollo
October 22, 2011, 8:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I think you are dishonouring the memory of the dead by bringing the politics into the arena.

You may have a view on the legitimacy or otherwise of operation in places such as Afghanistan and Iraq, which are fine as long as you leave them at the door when you come into this forum.

The Government did not establish the memorial - those who felt the loss of family members did.

Regardless of the colour of their politics, service personnel carry out the order they have given an undertaking to follow - and if they lose their lives, the bullet or the bomb that takes it, or the hand behind it, does not care about that colour either.

If you are going to have a go at the modern memorial garden, then you should have a go at the Commando Memorial as well, and call it an affront to have something there that glorifies a warmonger by the name of Winston Churchill.

And you might as well go and dig up all the graves where German military personnel were buried in British soil with honours when killed here during the war too. We can't have Nazis offending the sanctity of our fallen by being buried near them.

The memorial is to the dead.
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Admin
October 22, 2011, 9:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The Black Watch Museum was targeted by vandals this week:

Vandals target museum of famous Scots army regiment | Dundee and Tayside | STV News

I note the Black Watch fought in Iraq in 2003, and lost at least one member.

Perhaps a new museum should have been opened somewhere else after 2003, as those who served in the Watch from 2003 on must surely be bringing dishonour to the memory of those who went before them.

They should have refused go to Iraq, shouldn't they?

Seriously, there is a degree of leniency exercised - but if a subject is judged to have been hijacked by a political issue, it will be kicked to death or thrown out.

There are plenty of other forums out there where this sort of thing quickly has people at one another's throats as beliefs are challenged - and it will not happen in this forum.

We are already missing two board in here which are 'resting', and might have been coming back in November, but probably won't now, and I'd hate to see any others join them.

We've managed six years largely without such input - and I don't want to be put in the position of kicking out posts, or turning a blind eye to the Forum rules.

I don't even want to ever have to point at those rules, they shouldn't really even be needed - but we can touch on matters with political affiliations, and the rules say go with the matter, NOT the politics.

Let's carry on - on matters of theft and memorial.

Thank you.
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jmb
October 22, 2011, 10:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Dugald
The BBC News item of Oct 20th states that: "The Commando Memorial at Spean Bridge is dedicated to those who trained in the area during World War II".

I have visited this memorial twice, and as far as I recall the above quotation from the memorial by the BBC is correct. However, in the BBC article it states: " A nearby memorial garden honours servicemen and women killed in conflicts, including operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.". I would hope that this nearby memorial garden is recognised as having nothing whatever to do with the Commando Memorial at Spean Bridge. I submit that not only has a contribution-box been stolen... the sanctity of the location has also been interfered with!


An "area of remembrance" was set up near the main memorial presumably because people were leaving things near it so it was felt better to have a special area.  There were many commemorations of people lost in WWII, ones who served in WWII and died later then ones lost in later conflicts after WWII through to Afghanistan.  This was getting very full so earlier this year it was expanded, the existing commemorations were placed temporarily on area at the back of the car park.  The new area looks just about finished, I suspect there will be some sort of dedication around Remembrance Day but just guessing.  There are some pictures of mine of both the old area and others from a couple of weeks ago on Canmore, HER and the HER Flickr group.

The Commando Memorial has become associated with the Commando in general over the years so I cannot see any problem with losses in later conflicts being commemorated there.  There is also the newer one in Fort William dedicated to only those trained in Lochaber.

MB
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jmb
October 22, 2011, 10:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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By the way with earlier comments, there is some controversy about the Brookwood Memorial at the moment.  Amongst the names of British servicemen from WWII with no known grave are three executed for being a traitor and for murder.  Some want the names removed.

MB
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Apollo
November 5, 2011, 1:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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As we approach November 11, 2011, and Remembrance Sunday, there is news of Scotland's first 'Field of Remembrance'.
Quoted Text
charity volunteers to help plant the 11,000 remembrance crosses at the Scott Monument in Princes Street Gardens.

The temporary memorial has been organised by Poppyscotland to mark the 90th anniversary of the Scottish Poppy Appeal and will remain open until Sunday November 13.

The tribute to British servicemen and women will include a special area with photographs of those who have lost their lives during the continuing operations in Afghanistan.

Scotland's first Field of Remembrance to open in Edinburgh | Edinburgh News | STV Local
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jmb
November 5, 2011, 9:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I noticed yesterday that council workers were finishing off moving the private memorials back to the new Area of Remembrance near the Spean Bridge Commando Memorial from the temporary location.

MB
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WANLOCK
November 6, 2011, 10:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Enigma
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May I interject, i served in the RN, never a hero or do I consider myself as a veteren.however it opened up a new world when I left to enter an industry that was looking for personnel that could endure hardships in an all male environment for 3 months in deserts and jungles, with discipline and training in the area we were working. My proudist moment, when still in the service,on a stone frigate, we were mustered to attend the Cenetaph event for 'Remenbrance Sunday', bussed from our shore base at an ungodly hour, cold miserable, with order 'burbery's off' stand in line for hours in a cold Novenber day,, yes it was difficult, everyone was  proud that we honoured those who had made the supreme sacrifice.  
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Apollo
November 7, 2011, 9:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It looks as if The Sunday Telegraph has a wider campaign initiated by an MP seeking to have these metal thieves in general  -  we did refer to those that steal cable already, and the widespread damage they cause as the are prepared to risk their lives (and sometime die) by stealing live cables  -  dealt with more severely than at present.

There was another article on the memorial, and wider aspect, this weekend.

As noted above, this also raises the issue not only of the thieves and sellers, but also of the buyers:

Metal thieves dishonour the war dead with their vandalism - Telegraph

I suspect my point may be misunderstood, but given that the efforts of whole organisations set up to tackle drugs, immigration, alcohol, tobacco, and firearms make only a minimal impressions on these large-scale crimes, then there's little point in merely adding some new legislation or licensing of dealers, perhaps, and expecting it to achieve anything - and it would take years to get in place, during which time the offences will only grow.

It would be more productive to initiate some sort of education system to alert those who police such things to the this type of event (it would appear that the memorial incidents are not noticed until maintenance is due), and simply use the full extent of existing powers.

As with many supposedly 'new' offences, we don't need more or new legislation to bog the system down, we just need the existing legislation to be more actively enforced, as this matter is just one of theft and reset, both adequately covered by existing criminal legislation.
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jmb
November 7, 2011, 4:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I took some pictures of the new Area of Remembrance at the Spean Bridge Commando Memorial earlier, will upload to MyCanmore and Flickr HER Group later.

Sadly there is plenty of room for expansion.  Also one area has been set aside for ashes to spread.

MB
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Apollo
November 7, 2011, 11:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I wonder if this action is purely coincidental, or if someone has been reading the news, and issued a suggestion for 'collar-feeling' of scrap metal dealers?
Quoted Text
Scrap metal dealers in Scotland and landlords in Wales are among those being put under the microscope by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC).

The UK tax authority has announced five sectors that it is planning to target to ensure businesses are paying tax.

This also includes fast food outlets in Scotland and builders in the north-west of England.

Previous campaigns by HMRC have targeted dentists and, most recently, those who own property overseas.

HMRC staff will be seeking out scrap metal dealers in Scotland who suppress their income or inflate their expenditure to evade tax.

"We will not tolerate those who break the rules," said David Gauke, the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury.

"This taskforce will come down hard on scrap metal dealers and their customers or suppliers who have chosen to break the rules or deliberately evade the tax they should be paying. This is just the start."

We'll never know...
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Apollo
November 8, 2011, 12:03am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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While some show less respect...

This year's Remembrances seem to be taking on a higher profile than before, with Inverness stepping things up:

On Friday, traffic will be stopped in the city centre - the first time since World War II that this has happened in Inverness to commemorate Armistice Day.

Staff at council offices will also halt work for a two-minute silence.

Events organised by Highland Council and Royal British Legion Scotland also include laying poppies at war graves in the Kilvean and Torvean cemeteries.

Inverness Provost Jimmy Gray said the act of remembrance had grown in importance for the council and the city.

He added: "As a measure of its importance, this is the first time that traffic has been stopped in Inverness on Armistice Day since the Second World War."


BBC News - Traffic to stop in Inverness for Armistice Day
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jmb
November 8, 2011, 12:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I would like to see more places having organised laying of poppy crosses on war graves.  It is difficult in the bigger cemeteries like Tomnahurich in Inverness which has a couple of hundred war graves but many have quite manageable numbers that a school could easily do.  I did offer one local group to show them the locations of all the war graves because I have a copy of the details and also know of some post-WWII service graves which are not listed by the CWGC.  I have seen some cemeteries where the RBL seem to have put poppy crosses on war graves but they usually just do the ones with the CWGC headstones when it would be difficult to find the others which are also official war graves but don't have CWGC headstones.  I was annoyed to see one church where they seem to have handed out poppy crosses to the congregation and they had just dumped them by the door of the church.

MB
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BenCooper
November 8, 2011, 11:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Enigma
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The whole poppy day thing does bother a lot of people, myself included - I don't particularly want to get into an argument about it all, but I think that it's something that people should be free to observe privately if they wish, but it should not be a national event.
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Apollo
November 9, 2011, 12:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oh I don't know - I don't think a statement like "The whole poppy day thing does bother a lot of people" can be made without enlightening naive idiots like me who have no idea why that should be the case, unless they are attaching some peculiar attribute to it that it does not actually represent, or why something that affected the world and which the whole nation took part in, should not be a national event.

After all, we collectively appear to be able to revere grown men kicking a ball around a field as a national event, and devote a lot more time, money, attention, and worship towards it than we do to Remembrance

The aspect of disrespect, vandalism, and inappropriate behaviour is still hitting the news in the run up to Remembrance Sunday, with Fife joining those that made the news:
Quoted Text
A group of youths in an Angus town are showing a "total lack of respect" for a war memorial in the run up to Remembrance Sunday.

Carnoustie's War Memorial has been the site of anti-social behaviour among young people meeting there, including vandalism, underage drinking and littering.

Youths show 'total lack of respect' for war memorial | Dundee and Tayside | STV News
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Apollo
November 9, 2011, 12:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Related story just popped up:

BBC News - Who, What, Why: Which countries wear poppies?

The answer

UK
Canada
Australia
New Zealand
South Africa

In total, 120 countries outside the UK are sent 3m poppies by Royal British Legion, mostly ex-pats

They include Spain, France, Germany, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, Cyprus and Argentina


This has also been covered before, but I just like to quote it
Quoted Text
In Scotland, about 5 million poppies are distributed each year by Poppyscotland, but they look slightly different. Unlike the standard two petals and a single green leaf, the Scottish ones have four petals and no leaf.

The Scottish poppy pin "is botanically correct," says Leigh James, spokeswoman for Poppyscotland. There's also a financial reason for the difference - adding a leaf would cost an extra £15,000 a year.
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Dugald
November 9, 2011, 1:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Armistice Days in Wartime Glasgow.

Armistice Days in wartime Glasgow were treated as something special, and the observance of the day was pretty widespread throughout the city. The only formal ceremonies I ever attended were those at Greenfield School, Govan High School, and one at 60 Main St. Bridgeton with the 6th Btn. H.L.I. Army Cadets. The Great War had ended a mere 22 or so years before these WWII days, and since most of the pupils had close relatives who had served in the Great War, they had a pretty accurate idea of what Armistice Day represented. These ceremonies were always steeped in patriotic tradition with the reading of Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae's "Flanders Fields", and the singing of "God Save The King". Colonel McCrae's invocation to "Take up our quarrel with the foe:" didn't fall on deaf ears at these assemblies, and doubtless bore some fruit

There were of course much more formal ceremonies at a variety of Cenotaphs throughout the city, with the main one taking place, with appropriate military pomp and circumstance, at the Glasgow Cenotaph in George Square. The traditional observance of two-minutes silence at 11 am was, by and large, practiced throughout the city. Glasgow Corporation transit vehicles for example, generally stopped, although there were vehicles which for one reason or another did not. The yards and factories too, generally sounded their horns at 11 am and stopped work for the traditional two minutes of remembrance.

The phrases "Lest we forget" and "Their Name Liveth For Evermore ", used over the years at these ceremonies, acquired a veneration, hallowed perhaps, yet simply appealed to us not to forget those who died in the wars. At school we were encouraged to use the two minutes silence for personal reflection. Since these days I for example, think of the people I had known who were killed in the war. I was acquainted with six men who were killed in WWII. By "acquainted", I mean they were not personal friends, merely people with whom I'd had some personal relationship.

Yes, in wartime Glasgow, much was done, lest we forgot those names, it was hoped, would liveth for evermore.

Related aside:
To this list of six, I have recently added the name of one, Mr. Meschi, once the proprietor of a 'chip shop' on Uist St., in Govan. A Mr Meschi while being transported to Canada as an enemy alien lost his life when the troopship "Andorra Star" was torpedoed and sunk on July 2nd 1940. Whether or not he was the Italian proprietor of a shop on Uist St. I do not know, but for me his name is one of those which will liveth for evermore . When Italy entered the war in June 1940, I was among those who looted the interned Mr. Meschi's chip shop.
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jmb
November 9, 2011, 1:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I wondered about the leaf on all the poppies that I have seen worn on TV, I thought it was a deluxe version but had not realised that the Scottish version was slightly different.  

MB
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Apollo
November 9, 2011, 9:38am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Those who stay on the 'sensible' side of Twitter may be interested in the following:
Quoted Text
The account, @RealTimeWWII, features up to 40 tweets each day and has attracted almost 45,000 followers as German forces tear across Europe in the autumn of 1939.

It covers major military and political developments, as well as featuring eyewitness testimony from the battlefield, contemporary photography and newsreel footage.

Created by 24-year-old Alwyn Collinson, the project is an attempt to “help people feel like they’re there”.

“I'm hoping to use Twitter to help bring the past to life, helping people understand the past as people at the time saw it, without the benefit of hindsight,” he said.

“I want them to see that people then were just like they are.”

The busiest day for the account so far has been September 26, when the Wermacht mounted its final assault on Warsaw. Mr Collinson illustrated the battle using eyewitness accounts from Polish soldiers and civilians, abridged to comply with Twitter’s 140-character limit.

“The stream of wounded is unceasing. We leave the dying in the corridor - no room in the wards," reads one tweet from Jadwiga Sosnkowska, a nurse.

Six-year project to tweet the Second World War - Telegraph

This is the relevant link:

WW2 Tweets from 1939 (realtimewwii) on Twitter
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jmb
November 9, 2011, 10:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Talking of real-time, Radio 4 Extra is repeating on Friday a documentary / drama that was on Radio 4 some years ago.  It follows a bombing raid on Germany in real time.

Quoted Text
DRAMA: Len Deighton - Bomber
On: BBC Radio 4 Extra    
Date: Friday 11th November 2011 (starting in 2 days)
Time: 14:30 to 16:00 (1 hour and 30 minutes long)

Planning and Preparation.
18th Feb 1943 at 1430 - RAF Lancaster crews plan a bombing raid over Germany. Real time documentary drama with Samuel West. Episode 1 of 4.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Copyright (c) GipsyMedia Limited.


With further programmes later in the day.
17:40 - 17:50
19:50 - 21:20
23:30 - 00:00

MB
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BenCooper
November 9, 2011, 10:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Enigma
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Quoted from Apollo
Oh I don't know - I don't think a statement like "The whole poppy day thing does bother a lot of people" can be made without enlightening naive idiots like me who have no idea why that should be the case, unless they are attaching some peculiar attribute to it that it does not actually represent, or why something that affected the world and which the whole nation took part in, should not be a national event.


Okay. Well I know a lot of people who refuse to wear the poppy - in fact I struggle to think of any family or friends who do - and while I have not asked any of them why they do so here are my reasons:

The involvement of the military deeply bothers me. Whether it's the intention or not, the idea of honouring the war dead is very conflated with the idea of honouring the war they were involved in. Thousands of people marching in uniform makes a statement - it might not be the statement they intend to make, but it is still a statement glorifying the military.

The poppy does not represent the dead of other nations, and especially the millions of civilian dead in war, who didn't even have the means to defend themselves.

The connection to modern conflict. I can just about get onboard with the idea that WWI and especially WWII were extraordinary events, but the modern conflicts are not, and they involve professional soldiers who know exactly what they sign up for. I see no difference between a risky job as a soldier, and a risky job as a trawler man or miner. They all do risky jobs which benefit the country in some way (debatably, in the case of some modern conflicts), but they do those risky jobs in return for money, so I see no difference.

The media furore. It seems that anyone who questions "supporting our troops", who refuses to stand still for 2 minutes when told to, who refuses to wear a piece of red paper, who sets fire to said piece of paper in a picture online, is strongly criticised, and I don't like that. I don't like bring told what I'm meant to think about things.

So the you go.
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Dugald
November 10, 2011, 12:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I have always worn a poppy on Armistice Day. I wear one today in Canada and most of the people in the town where I live wear one. Why do I wear a poppy? I wear one as an indication of the compassion I feel for those who suffered during the two world wars, and with whom I was acquainted in one way or another. The poppy to me represents compassion. It is a part of the trappings of our Armistice Day.

The poppy is something I learned about at school in Glasgow and it's a part of Dr. McRae's " In Flanders Fields", which I learned to recite at school. It is mentioned earlier on this thread that  " The poppy does not represent the dead of other nations". I'm not sure that is true, because the dead under McCrae's crosses are not only Allied dead; German dead lie under just the very same poppies, as the Allied dead.

Herewith is a short poem which I thought might bear some measure of relevance to the notion of  the poppy not representing the dead of other nations. You might find it of interest. Those of you who are familiar with Dr. McRae's, " In Flanders Fields" needn't be fluent in the German language to appreciate the gist of the German words in this poem. The poem is as follows:

"Auf Flanderns Flur.
In Flanderns Flur, da blüht der Mohn; an Gräbern Reith' an Reihe' schon.
Dort ruhn die Unsern. Wolken nah sind Opfer singend Lerchen da,
Im Kampflärm kaum gehörter Ton. Uns holte Tod.
Der Tage Lauf entschwand geschwind.
Wir sahn verlohn- im Fallen- Abendsonnenlicht.
Wir kannten Liebe, ruhn jetzt schlicht auf Flanderns Flur.

Nimm auf den Kampf als treuer Sohn, wo Hände zu erkalten drohn.
Ergreif die Fackel, eh sie bricht, sonst fehlt uns Schlaf,
Blüht auch der Mohn in Flanderns Flur.".

It might whet the appetite of the history enthusiasts among you to learn that the poem was written by one, Prof. Dr. B. Freiherr von Richthofen. Oh yes, the same name Richthofen as that of the 'Red Baron', the victor of many air battles during the Great War and unltimately himself a victim on April 21st. 1918. Needless to say, the author was not the Red Baron. To the best of my knowledge the author is/was the Red Baron's nephew, Prof. Dr. B. Freiherr von Richthofen. The Poem is of course a German translation of Dr. McRae's "In Flanders Fields".
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Apollo
November 12, 2011, 2:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Continuation of the theme:
Quoted Text
Police are investigating after a war memorial in southern Scotland was vandalised on Armistice Day.

The incident happened on Main Street in Kirkconnel some time before 01:30.

Police officers made the discovery while on patrol and tried to remove as much of the graffiti as possible.

A spokesman said they were following a "positive line of inquiry" but urged the public to help trace whoever was responsible for a "particularly distasteful and shameful crime".

The attack took place on the eve of remembrance events across the country.

The Royal British Legion Scotland (RBLS) was hoping for widespread observance of a two-minute silence at 11:00.

A police spokesman said the memorial had been daubed with paint in the attack.

BBC News - Kirkconnel war memorial vandalised on Armistice Day
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Dugald
November 12, 2011, 12:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I have come across Vandalism of this sort in Scotland before. Back in the 80's when returning from a tour of the Scottish border region my wife and I dropped into Dykehead and Shotts (I was never sure whether we were in Dykehead or Shotts!) in order to see the town whence the then current World Champion Pipe Band came. We spoke to several people in the town, but none of them knew anything about such a band! We wanted to get a postcard to send to our daughter who played for a band in Toronto. Anyway, there wasn't a single shop to be found in this (surely the least bustling burg in all of Scotland!) town, and on the advice of one of the few people we met we went to the library.

There was a war memorial right in front of the library with the names of the people killed in the Great War and WWII. It was quite an attractive memorial of grey marble and quality slate, suggestive of a time when the economic conditions were better than they were in the 1980's. One side of the memorial had had some of the names of the persons for whom the memorial was built chiseled off: not painted off or anything else that could be quickly repaired, but permanently destroyed! I'd never seen a memorial damaged to this extent. My wife, who has a Canadian accent, spoke to the lady in the library about this and the lady became very clearly embarrassed, and informed my wife that it had happened before she came and she didn't know anything about it.

Nah, we never did find a picture post card of the town; this town did however make the ride into Glasgow seem more attractive than it really was. I wonder if the damage was ever repaired.
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Apollo
November 12, 2011, 1:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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That sounds rather specific, chiselling off a name or names, and you may have stumbled across a story with some history behind it, rather than 'mere' vandalism.

Vandals would surely just have hammered at the monument randomly with a hammer or mallet, simply to do as much damage as possible anywhere, rather than target something specific.

I am sure I have read, in the distant past, of people who were offended by some individuals being mentioned on memorials, and taken matters into their own hands to 'correct' things.

And we have others who see the inclusion of people known to be murderers and other serious criminals, as an insult to their relatives, even though both may have perished in war in the service of their country.

Perhaps someone with local knowledge might notice this and contribute.
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Apollo
November 14, 2011, 10:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Forewarned is Forearmed
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While it doesn't actually mention the subjects covered in this thread, and the amount is trivial - the real cost here is emotional while the value of of the scrapped memorial is measured only in a few £££ or tens of £££ - clearly the same legislation that may be introduced for the larger scale crimes involving cables and similar would apply.

Six deaths are reported in the story, so it's a pity that that memorial hardware can't be wired up, but the plaques are just too near to passing members of the public

The theft of metal cable from power stations and railway lines is costing hundreds of millions of pounds a year and could put lives at risk.

MPs are to debate giving greater powers to regulate the scrap metal industry, with councils across the UK also calling for a change.

There has been a huge surge in the theft of metals such as copper, lead and bronze.

Ed Thomas reports.


BBC News - MPs to debate metal dealer regulation amid rising thefts
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Apollo
November 23, 2011, 2:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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While it might not be exactly the kind of war memorial we have considered, this story does just seem to be an extension of the general theme regarding respect...
Quoted Text
Police have appealed for public help after a famous monument in the heart of Hawick was damaged by vandals.

The Hornshole memorial, which features a horse and rider, had part of its flag snapped off some time between 17:00 on Friday and 09:00 on Monday.

Lothian and Borders Police said the incident would be "difficult to comprehend" for local people.

BBC News - Hawick's Hornshole memorial struck by vandals
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jmb
November 28, 2011, 1:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Dan Snow is doing a piece on The One Show tonight about the destruction of war memorials.

MB
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